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Kratom



Mitragyna speciosa

7.21.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Kratom
Mitragyna speciosa

Mitragyna speciosa (commonly known as kratom, also ketum) is a tropical evergreen tree in the coffee family (Rubiaceae) native to Southeast Asia in the Indochina and Malaysia phytochoria (botanical regions). M. speciosa is indigenous to Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia, Myanmar, and Papua New Guinea where it has.

Overdose of kratom is managed similar to opioid overdose, and naloxone can be considered to treat an overdose that results in a reduced impulse to breathe, despite mixed results for its utility, based on animal models.

The United States Drug Enforcement Administration stated in 2013: "There is no legitimate medical use for kratom". Kratom has become popular as a recreational drug and has been promoted with claims that it can improve mood, relieve pain and help with opiate addiction. As of 2013, kratom and key extracts have been studied in cells and in animals, but no clinical trials have been conducted in the United States.

Other active chemicals in M.

Buy Kratom Online Cheap Kratom For Sale & FREE SHIPPING

3.17.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Kratom
Buy Kratom Online Cheap Kratom For Sale & FREE SHIPPING

Buy kratom online for cheap from the leading online vendor, offering a variety of the best kratom for sale. We guarantee the highest quality of the kratom powder you purchase!.

Several other countries among them Australia, Burma, Denmark, Finland, Romania, Poland, Malaysia, Vietnam and Lithuania have banned the possession and commercialization of Kratom. Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Wisconsin, Vermont, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Sarasota County – FL, San Diego – CA, and Jerseyville – IL have banned the possession, trade and distribution of substances containing Mitragynine and 7-Hydroxymitragynine, and kratom sale and possession are not legal. In United States, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) strictly prohibits internal use of this herb.

What Is Kratom? Why Does the DEA Want to Ban It?

9.23.2018 | Makayla Blare
Kratom
What Is Kratom? Why Does the DEA Want to Ban It?

(Editor's note: This story was updated on Oct. 12, 2016, with the DEA withdrawing its intent to ban kratom and establishing a public comment period.) Sept. 19, 2016 -- Advocates say the herb kratom offers relief from pain, depression, and anxiety. Scientists say it may hold the key to treating chronic pain and may even be a.

And since it’s been sold as an herbal supplement, kratom hasn’t received the same amount of governmental oversight as an approved drug. Prozialeck’s review also found that in almost every case of reported kratom side effects, there were other things involved, like other drugs or health conditions.

Prozialeck, PhD, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL. Walter C.

But he says many in the scientific community do support more research on the drug, especially given the nation’s opioid epidemic.

Press Announcements Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott

8.22.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Kratom
Press Announcements Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott

The FDA has issued a public health advisory related to mounting concerns regarding risks associated with the use of kratom. Over the past several years, a botanical substance known as kratom has raised significant concerns given its increasing prevalence and potential safety risks.

We’ve learned a tragic lesson from the opioid crisis: that we must pay early attention to the potential for new products to cause addiction and we must take strong, decisive measures to intervene. From the outset, the FDA must use its authority to protect the public from addictive substances like kratom, both as part of our commitment to stemming the opioid epidemic and preventing another from taking hold.

Today, the agency issued a public health advisory related to the FDA’s mounting concerns regarding risks associated with the use of kratom.

What it's like to be high on kratom, according to the people who use

5.19.2018 | Dylan Leapman
Kratom
What it's like to be high on kratom, according to the people who use

The Drug Enforcement Administration has said it will ban the kratom plant for two years because it can produce effects similar to opiates. Although it's been used for centuries in Southeast Asia, its use is relatively new in the United States, spurred in large part by users sharing reports of their experiences.

The DEA itself has admitted that kratom likely isn't deserving of the DEA's schedule 1 designation, reserved for only the most dangerous drugs.

But these numbers suggest that the users who visit Erowid are offering unvarnished assessments of their drug use, the good AND the bad.

But by far the highest ratio of bad-to-good experiences can be found among the site's alcohol users, who submit nearly 13 negative reports for every positive one.

Here's what that looks like.

The more rigorous deep-dive into kratom's effects by Marc Swogger and his colleagues suggest that the drug's effects are "generally mild and pleasant," with a risk of some side effects, including a risk of dependency.

Then they categorized the reports according to the individuals' overall experiences, positive and negative — euphoria, pain relief, nausea, itching, etc.