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Bbc news tramadol



Prescription drug addict's mum has 'funeral planned'

4.15.2018 | Dylan Leapman
Bbc news tramadol
Prescription drug addict's mum has 'funeral planned'

Louise's story and that of another mother who has already lost her son to drugs feature in a BBC Radio Ulster documentary to be broadcast this weekend. It looks at the struggles faced by those addicted to drugs such as tramadol, lyrica and fentanol and how that addiction is life-changing for their families.

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She's told her son of the plans; sometimes he agrees that he needs help, at other times he insists it will never happen to him.

"He was covered in blood where he cut himself," she said.

It looks at the struggles faced by those addicted to drugs such as tramadol, lyrica and fentanol and how that addiction is life-changing for their families.

"And then you have the stigma - people think it's the parents' fault.

Powerful painkiller use 'doubled in 15 years'

7.18.2018 | Robert Albertson
Bbc news tramadol
Powerful painkiller use 'doubled in 15 years'

The use of potentially addictive painkillers across England has doubled in the last 15 years, according to a report by leading public health experts. Researchers found one in 20 people was being prescribed opioid painkillers, such as codeine and tramadol. They also found that drugs were being prescribed.

Research in just a handful of GP practices where he lives in Scunthorpe alone identified more than 100 people dependent on painkillers.

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But responsibility for helping them falls between the NHS and local councils, and schemes like the one James is on are rare.

Experts say long-term use leads to a risk of addiction while the benefits become greatly reduced.

It looked at those who had been prescribed at least one of four types of potentially addictive drugs - known as Dependence Forming Medicines - between 2000 and 2015.

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A routine prescription drug led James to the brink of destruction.

For James, the side-effects were terrible - headaches, nausea, constipation - and then a series of seizures that he feared would end his life.

"They can ruin your life without you knowing because I do believe that probably within a year - taking the same amounts or increasing - they probably would have killed me.".

They also found that drugs were being prescribed for longer periods of time.

The data comes from a wider study of 50,000 NHS patients in England by the Public Health Research Consortium.

Today's report doesn't contain hard data on addiction but it does indicate there is a growing need to closely monitor the use of these powerful drugs.

James went from taking eight pills a day to 50 - and almost before he knew it, his life had spiralled out of control.

Doctors say that for short-term use, opioid painkillers, such a tramadol, codeine or morphine can be very effective.

The biggest single group of drugs were opioid painkillers which can help relieve pain for cancer patients or those with short-term needs.

Neil Smith, research director at the National Centre for Social Research, said: "This report highlights that a balance needs to be struck between avoiding prescribing that might lead to dependence or other harms and ensuring proper access to medicines to relieve suffering and treat disorders.

Researchers found one in 20 people was being prescribed opioid painkillers, such as codeine and tramadol.

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The country condemns the US-backed United Nations moves against its missile and nuclear programmes.

But Dr Cathy Stannard, a specialist in pain management, says it is clear that patients using opioid drugs for a long time are often getting little benefit, but suffer all the side-effects.

"But out of a population who are taking these drugs, the majority are not benefiting and they should be supported to come off these medicines.".

I thought I would be on these tablets short term, but then before I knew it, I couldn't get off them.".

Briton held in Egypt over drugs made 'honest mistake'

8.19.2018 | Dylan Leapman
Bbc news tramadol
Briton held in Egypt over drugs made 'honest mistake'

A British woman who has been detained in Egypt for bringing nearly 300 Tramadol tablets into the country made "an innocent, honest mistake", according to her brother. Laura Plummer, from Hull, was transporting the pills for her Egyptian partner who suffers from back pain. It is illegal to supply prescription.

Mr Turner said Ms Plummer had brought the tablets to Egypt along with a number of other goods.

There was also Naproxen as well.". "So she took those over with her," Mr Plummer said. "Laura didn't even check what they were, she didn't even know there was Tramadol in the bag.

Laura Plummer, from Hull, was transporting the pills for her Egyptian partner who suffers from back pain.

She wouldn't have a clue that she was doing something unlawful'.". "Her father said to me 'look, the truth is she wouldn't know Tramadol from a Panadol.

Mr Turner said: "The family describe Laura to me as somebody who is very naïve.

He said that a British Embassy representative has been visiting Ms Plummer regularly and has been in touch with her family.

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He said that Laura, a shop assistant, had told a colleague about her partner's back pain and the work colleague replied that she could get some tablets from her GP.

Trafficking of pills used by suicide bombers soars in Sahel

3.14.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Bbc news tramadol
Trafficking of pills used by suicide bombers soars in Sahel

6 days ago The UN's drugs agency warns smuggling of the opioid tramadol, used by Boko Haram, must be stopped.

The UNODC says the abuse of the drug - usually smuggled from Asia through the Gulf by criminal gangs - is escalating into a major health crisis in the Sahel, particularly in northern Mali and Niger, with sub-Saharan Africa's young population potentially providing traffickers with an even larger market.

"This raises the question of who provides the tablets to fighters from Boko Haram and al-Qaeda, including young boys and girls, preparing to commit suicide bombings.".

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The country condemns the US-backed United Nations moves against its missile and nuclear programmes.

Tighter controls on painkiller tramadol needed - ACMD

5.16.2018 | Robert Albertson
Bbc news tramadol

Tighter controls should be put on the painkiller tramadol according to the UK's official drugs advisers.

The country condemns the US-backed United Nations moves against its missile and nuclear programmes.

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The Home Office said it would consider the recommendations.

However, the deaths were mostly linked to misuse. Tramadol is available on prescription in the UK.

Tramadol is an opioid-like drug which is used to treat pain from cancer and musculoskeletal problems.

In a letter to the Home Secretary and Health Secretary last week he said the number of deaths related to the drug was 154 in 2011. Up from 87 in 2009 and 83 in 2008.

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A Home Office spokesperson said: "We are grateful for the recommendations made by the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs regarding tramadol and will respond in due course.".

Tighter controls should be put on the painkiller tramadol according to the UK's official drugs advisers.

"The ACMD's review of harms associated with the non-medicinal use of tramadol was prompted by an increasing number of reports within the NHS of tramadol's misuse and harms," the letter said.

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The ACMD's chairman Prof Les Iversen called for tramadol to be made a Class C drug, with penalties of up to two years in prison for possession and 14 years for supply.

The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) said it was concerned about an increase in the number of deaths related to misusing the psychoactive drug.

It can also cause too much serotonin to be released in the brain, which can be fatal. Overdosing can cause rapid heart beat, high blood pressure, vomiting and seizures.