News
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Z

Death statistics by cause



35 Years Of American Death FiveThirtyEight

7.25.2018 | Robert Albertson
Death statistics by cause
35 Years Of American Death FiveThirtyEight

Our maps show estimated mortality rates for leading causes of death for every county in the U.S. going back to 1980.

Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

An event as catastrophic as Hurricane Katrina can create a kind of ripple of mortality as people flee the disaster (resulting in a strain on resources elsewhere) or if people from other places happen to be in harm’s way at the time of the event (since deaths are counted in the county where people lived rather than where they died). But the slightly higher rates across the country are at least in part a side effect of the model, which sees such a dramatic rise in deaths in one place (the Gulf Coast) as an indication that otherwise similar places should also have higher mortality rates for that cause of death.

What are the top causes of death by age and gender? Visual.ONS

4.22.2018 | Destiny Laird
Death statistics by cause
What are the top causes of death by age and gender? Visual.ONS

The second leading cause of death in 2013 was lung cancer (malignant neoplasm of trachea, bronchus and lung) for males and ischaemic heart disease for females. Over the course of the 20th century, there have been steady decreases in mortality rates for the main three broad disease groups (cancer.

This site is in beta.

There were 506,790 deaths in England and Wales in 2013, up 1.5% since 2012. The leading cause of death for females was dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, which accounted for 12.2% of female deaths during 2013. Ischaemic heart disease was the leading cause of death for males in 2013, which accounted for 15.4% of male deaths. The second leading cause of death in 2013 was lung cancer (malignant neoplasm of trachea, bronchus and lung) for males and ischaemic heart disease for females.

1 in 1,000 deaths were among children aged 1-4 in 2013 Around 0.1% of all deaths were among children aged 1-4 years old.

Deaths

5.23.2018 | Robert Albertson
Death statistics by cause
Deaths

Death registrations summary tables - England and Wales. Death statistics reported include counts of deaths by age and sex and by selected cause. Standardised mortality ratios, age-standardised mortality rates and infant mortality rates by area of usual residence are also included.

Deaths where Clostridium difficile infection was mentioned on the death certificate by sex, age group and whether the death occurred in hospital or elsewhere.

Summary tables including age-standardised mortality rates. Annual data on UK death registrations.

All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0, except where otherwise stated.

Annual data on death registrations contains death rates, cause of death data by sex and age and death registrations by area of residence and single year of age.

Deaths broken down by age, sex, area and cause of death sourced from the deaths register.

Weekly death figures provide provisional counts of the number of deaths registered in England and Wales in the latest weeks for which data are available.

Dataset containing aggregated numbers of deaths by age-group, sex, year and underlying cause.

A handy guide to let you know where to find local statistics.

We look at the 3 measures of average life span, life expectancy at birth (mean age at death), median age at death and modal age at death, to better understand mortality at older age.

Cause of Death Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency

3.21.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Death statistics by cause

More detailed finalised statistics on death registrations in Northern Ireland in 2015 with details relating to causes such as malignant neoplasms, heart disease, suicide and accidents are available from the Death by cause Section of the Registrar General Annual Report. Provisional cause of death statistics for more recent.

The Tables include data on cause of death, gender, age group, geographical area and deprivation quintile. Alcohol deaths are defined as deaths which are directly related to alcohol. Drug deaths are split into drug related deaths and deaths due to drug misuse.

More detailed finalised statistics on death registrations in Northern Ireland in 2015 with details relating to causes such as malignant neoplasms, heart disease, suicide and accidents are available from the Death by cause Section of the Registrar General Annual Report.

Tables are produced for both Clostridium Difficile (C Diff) related deaths and MRSA related deaths and include age standarised mortality rates for these causes as well as information relating to age, gender, underlying cause of death and place of death. On an annual basis NISRA produce detailed statistics relating to deaths from Healthcare-Associated Infections.

See all related documents.

19 December 2017 19 December 2017 20 November 2017 07 November 2017. Suicide statistics provide an indicator of mental health and are important for monitoring trends in deaths resulting from intentional (and probable) self-harm.

Skip to content.

The number of deaths can vary depending on the season and in particular tend to increase in the winter. This section presents Excess Winter Mortality: the difference between the actual number of winter deaths in the 4 month period December to March and the expected number of deaths.

Provisional cause of death statistics for more recent years are available from the Registrar General Quarterly Reports.

NISRA are involved in the production of a number of other reports relating to specific causes of death. Links to these are provided below.

WHO The top 10 causes of death

9.27.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Death statistics by cause

Lower respiratory infections remained the most deadly communicable disease, causing 3.2 million deaths worldwide in 2015. The death rate from diarrhoeal diseases almost halved between 2000 and 2015, but still caused 1.4 million deaths in 2015. Similarly, tuberculosis killed fewer people during the same period, but is.

Sign up for WHO updates.

Lower respiratory infections remained the most deadly communicable disease, causing 3.2 million deaths worldwide in 2015. The death rate from diarrhoeal diseases almost halved between 2000 and 2015, but still caused 1.4 million deaths in 2015. HIV/AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death, having killed 1.1 million people in 2015 compared with 1.5 million in 2000. Similarly, tuberculosis killed fewer people during the same period, but is still among the top 10 causes with a death toll of 1.4 million.

Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are the world’s biggest killers, accounting for a combined 15 million deaths in 2015. These diseases have remained the leading causes of death globally in the last 15 years. Of the 56.4 million deaths worldwide in 2015, more than half (54%) were due to the top 10 causes.

Diabetes killed 1.6 million people in 2015, up from less than 1 million in 2000. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease claimed 3.2 million lives in 2015, while lung cancer (along with trachea and bronchus cancers) caused 1.7 million deaths. Deaths due to dementias more than doubled between 2000 and 2015, making it the 7th leading cause of global deaths in 2015.

Fact sheet Updated January 2017.

Road injuries killed 1.3 million people in 2015, about three-quarters (76%) of whom were men and boys. WHO 2017.