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Managing opioid induced constipation



Four Strategies for Managing Opioid-Induced Side Effects in Older

10.17.2018 | Destiny Laird
Managing opioid induced constipation
Four Strategies for Managing Opioid-Induced Side Effects in Older

Although symptomatic management of adverse effects is used commonly in practice, few studies have evaluated its efficacy or safety. The following section provides recommendations regarding symptomatic management of the most commonly occurring opioid-induced side effects: constipation, nausea, sedation, and.

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Pharmacologic prophylaxis of nausea at the time of initiating a trial of an opioid is not necessary in most cases, however, if symptoms significantly affect the older adult, antiemetics should be initiated. 31 These data highlight the importance of discussing possible side effects with patients before initiating a trial of an opioid therapy and learning which side effects patients are most eager to minimize or avoid altogether. For example, if an older patient taking an opioid develops nausea related to changes in position or ambulation, the history suggests stimulation of the vestibular system, which can be targeted by anticholinergics, such as scopolamine, and antihistamines, such as meclizine.

Opioid-Induced Constipation Treatment Medication and Remedies

12.19.2018 | Dylan Leapman
Managing opioid induced constipation
Opioid-Induced Constipation Treatment Medication and Remedies

Here's what you need to know about your treatment options for opioid-induced constipation, from medications to natural remedies and more.

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Bulk-forming fiber supplements include psyllium (Metamucil) and methylcellulose (Citrucel).

The Treatment of Opioid-Induced Constipation Patient Care

9.16.2018 | Makayla Blare
Managing opioid induced constipation
The Treatment of Opioid-Induced Constipation Patient Care

Physicians may have noticed a recent increased focus on the constipating effect of opioids. This appears to be due, not to new research, but to the FDA approval of a new medication, naloxegol (Movantik), which treats opioid-induced constipation (OIC) and is expected to be available soon, as well as the.

Unfortunay, because patients may receive limited information on OIC from their prescribers, they may be left on their own to decide how best to treat it. The problem is that although there are many medications available over the counter (OTC) to treat constipation, some of the most commonly used ones can actually exacerbate OIC rather than relieve it.

The main reason is that OIC can often be prevented by prophylactic measures that are both inexpensive and usually carry minimal risk of causing significant adverse events.

Treatments for Opioid-induced Constipation

3.10.2018 | Alexander Mercer
Managing opioid induced constipation
Treatments for Opioid-induced Constipation

When the constipation occurs as a direct result of the opioids, it is called opioid-induced constipation, or OIC, which is very similar to—though slightly different from—typical constipation (often called “functional constipation”). There are several treatment options available for OIC, and this article will outline.

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You may think you’re experiencing functional constipation, but if you’re using opioids for your chronic back pain or chronic neck pain, it may be opioid-induced constipation. Your doctor will take into account your spine condition and lifestyle when suggesting an opioid-induced constipation treatment plan for you. As always, before starting any treatment regimen, be sure to consult your doctor.

Alleviating Bowel-Backup in Opioid Induced Constipation

8.15.2018 | Dylan Leapman
Managing opioid induced constipation
Alleviating Bowel-Backup in Opioid Induced Constipation

The goal of opioid treatment is to relieve pain and discomfort, but one side effect of the drugs can replace that pain with another problem—opioid induced constipation (OIC). This constipation is more than just a minor inconvenience, says Gregory L. Holmquist, PharmD, CPE, a pain and palliative care.

Holmquist discusses how to assess patients for OIC, how to prevent the condition and how to manage it. Below Dr.

How are these patients best managed?. In a healthy population, the average frequency of bowel movements ranges from three times a day to three times a week. Based on a patient's perspective of what is "normal," he or she may report being constipated, without necessarily meeting the criteria for constipation.

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How does OIC differ from other types of constipation?

One of the keys to proper treatment is to avoid focusing on the frequency of stools, which can be highly variable among individuals, and instead to ask more detailed questions about stool quality and comfort.

Also, ask if stools have changed over time.